adobe indesign database Buy Adobe Illustrator CS5 for Mac OEM - Online Software Downloads Center adobe creative suite 3 contents adobe photoshop cs upgrade windows Buy Adobe Illustrator CS5 OEM - Online Software Downloads Center adobe indesign cs2 warez adobe indesign free downloads Buy Adobe Creative Suite 5 Master Collection OEM - Online Software Downloads Center open sourc corel draw adobe illustrator adobe photoshop free online tutorial Buy Adobe Flash Professional CS5 for Mac OEM - Online Software Downloads Center fonts for adobe photoshop cs adobe creative suite 2 Buy Adobe Flash Professional CS5 OEM - Online Software Downloads Center purchase adobe photoshop cs2 transparent colour gif in adobe photoshop Buy Adobe Photoshop CS5 Extended for Mac OEM - Online Software Downloads Center adobe indesign cs palettes adobe photoshop and not elements cs Buy Adobe Dreamweaver CS5 for Mac OEM - Online Software Downloads Center oem adobe photoshop cs2 download adobe photoshop 7.01 Buy Adobe InDesign CS5 for Mac OEM - Online Software Downloads Center adobe indesign xml adobe photoshop 6 upgrade Buy Adobe InDesign CS5 OEM - Online Software Downloads Center adobe cs3 keygenerator dreamweaver adobe illustrator tutorials post cards Buy Adobe Creative Suite 5 Master Collection for Mac OEM - Online Software Downloads Center adobe photoshop black and white images adobe creative free photo suite Buy Adobe Dreamweaver CS5 OEM - Online Software Downloads Center adobe illustrator course outline adobe photoshop elements 5.0 photo editing Buy Adobe Photoshop CS5 Extended OEM - Online Software Downloads Center adobe cs3 photoshop oem

Posts Tagged ‘social development’

A fair world

Tuesday, February 2nd, 2010

The second pillar of sustainable development

Su’Ad Muse

diversitystickyIf we were to imagine the perfect world, everybody would think of something different. But it’s safe to assume the first thing we’d all think of is people. Probably smiling, happy people, living in peace with each other and in harmony with nature. Sustainable development strives to achieve such a ‘perfect world’, one we can all agree on and which provides for us now and in the future. In this world there is no place for oppression and injustice, so it comes as no surprise that Social Equity is one of the four pillars of sustainable development

Social equity is about people. It strives to re-enforce Article 25 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights “Everyone has the right to a standard of living adequate for the health and well being of himself and his family, including food, clothing, housing and medical care and necessary social services and the right to security…” The concept of social equity boils down to one basic idea – fairness. This means everyone, regardless of sex, race, age, nationality or religion, has their basics needs accounted for and has the opportunity to lead dignified, comfortable lives. But for this to happen some things have got to change.

Poverty

Poverty is the most obvious barrier to establishing social equity, because if one lives in poverty most, if not all, of their needs as a human being are not met. Poverty is not a state reserved for starved children in Africa. Believe it or not poverty is everywhere. Due to war, famine, political unrest, disease, economic fluctuations or even simply lack of social services 1.4 billion people worldwide live below the poverty line – that’s a 1/4 of humanity! The problem is more severe in developing countries yet even the developed world is not completely safe guarded – every year 3 million people are reported homeless in the USA, with similar figures in Russia. So the stats are there, the question now is how can we improve the situation?

Show me the money!

mdgsgoaloneThe turn of the last century saw the establishment of Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) by the UN, eight goals to be achieved by 2015. Goal one is to cut extreme poverty in half. One of the major ways countries can help to achieve this goal, and the seven other goals, is by allocating 0.7% of their annual national income, know as the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) to aid and development. 0.7% doesn’t sound like much, but we are about five years out from the deadline and only five countries (The Netherlands, Luxemburg, Norway, Sweden and Denmark) have reached the target amount. The UN stresses the MDGs can be reached, but the richest countries in the world are going to need to dig deep. Change is simply not possible without the money.

Take Action

  • Support the MDGs by joining this years ‘Stand Up and Take Action’ campaign, you can find more information at www.standagainstpoverty.org  Get involved and break a world record while you’re at it!
  • Order your books online from www.goodbooksnz.co.nz all the profit go to Oxfam and you’ll be ‘turning the page on poverty’.

Child rights

happy-childrenChildren and young people are humanities greatest asset. It’s only common sense then that the welfare of children be protected. The simplest way of doing this is by promoting and upholding children’s rights. The United Nations Convention of the Right of the Child has been adopted by every nation of earth (except two) and is concerned solely with children and their specific needs. However many children around the world are denied their rights and are exploited and abused. But before we get on our high horses and think New Zealand is above such madness, here are a couple of humbling (yet shocking) facts: 55 children were killed in New Zealand in the last five years due to abuse, 17 of which were under the age of one; our child homicide rate is increasing whereas other developed countries rates are decreasing; 25% of kiwi kids live in poverty (as defined by New Zealand).

Anti smacking or pro rights?

Aotearoa New Zealand has taken steps to address these issues with a nation wide anti-domestic violence campaign last year and the Repeal of Section 59. These steps are all heading in the right direction, and with Aotearoa New Zealand dealing with the issues on our own doorstep, we are in a better position to support the child rights movement globally. Save the Children, the UN and many other charitable organisations are working for children around the world.  The Save the Children ‘Re-write the future’ programme, for example, works to educate children in conflict– affected areas. Education not only allows children to understand their rights, but enables them to break the poverty cycle and gives them hope for the future.

Take Action

  • Get informed! Find out more about the Repeal of Section 59 and the upcoming referendum.
  • Campaign for the rights of children and become active in this field, contact Save the Child NZ www.savethechildren.org.nz and Action for children and youth Aotearoa www.acya.org.nz
  • If you’re outraged by the child homicide rate, voice your opinion- write letters to the editors, write for your school newspaper, because every persistent individual makes a difference in the long run!
Scales of justice, The Guildhall, City of Bath

Scales of Justice

(Un)Fair pay

Say two people, perhaps a black or white person, or a man and a woman, did the same job to the same standard. You would think they would get paid equally wouldn’t you? Unfortunately in many places, this is not the case. From young children in developing countries who are drastically under paid (or not even paid at all!) for their labour, to women in the west whose wages in some places are 47% less then their male counterparts, unfair pay affects people’s ability to look after themselves and their families. It can also affect whole countries. If people are exploited for cheap labour, and not paid enough, the GDP of the developing countries remains relatively low and the cycle of poverty continues. It is truly sad that people have their basic needs denied, not because they do not work hard for them, but because others pay them unfairly.

Take Action

  • As an employee know your rights, if you believe you are being paid unfairly take action start by having a chat to Youthline 0800 376633 or visit www.youthlaw.co.nz who can help you.
  • To support fair pay in the developing world buy fair trade

Sustainable development is about establishing a fair and just world for the people of today, and also of tomorrow. Establishing social equity should be one of our main priorities, because if we could insure everyone had their basic needs accounted for, humanity could collectively work together to solve other pressing issues facing us, like looking after Mother Earth. We can’t wait, however, for someone else to make the change, we have to be the change ourselves!

Learn more (references)pretty-tree

www.un.org/millenniumgoals
www.oxfam.co.nz
www.tradeaid.org.nz
www.amnesty.org.nz
www.globalissues.org
www.justfocus.org.nz
www.ace.mmu.ac.uk/esd/menu.html
http://en.allexperts.com/q/Human-Resources-2866

YWCA of Aotearoa-New Zealand (YWCA and Y-Dub)

Friday, February 20th, 2009


www.ywca.org.nz

What do they do?
The YWCA of Aotearoa-New Zealand work to empower women, especially young women, to reach their potential. They acknowledge their Christian and women’s heritage and commit themselves to Te Tiriti o Waitangi and to addressing all forms of oppression so that women together may attain social and economic justice.

How can I get involved?

There are nine YWCA Local Associations around Aotearoa-New Zealand, each offering valuable programmes and community services.

Check out the local association web sites here to discover what they are doing in your community.


YMCA

Friday, February 20th, 2009


www.ymca.org.nz

What do they do?
The New Zealand YMCA is a community organisation, based on Christian principles, which aims to enable individuals and families to develop physically, mentally and spiritually and enjoy a healthy quality of life.

How can I get involved?

YMCA is represented all around NZ, and they run a variety of programmes depending on the needs of that particular community. One programme that is currently run in many YMCA centres is ‘Raise up and Represent’.

The aim of Raise Up is to support youth in being physically fit, to encourage personal ownership and leadership, and to foster a sense of pride and respect for themselves, and the communities in which they live. YMCA are often searching for student leaders to help plan and implement Environmentally focused youth initiatives and activities for youth in their community. Contact your nearest YMCA for more info.

World Vision

Friday, February 20th, 2009


www.worldvision.co.nz

What do they do?
World Vision is a Christian humanitarian organisation dedicated to working with children, families and communities to overcome extreme poverty and injustice. World Vision New Zealand currently supports more than 70 projects in more than 25 countries.

How can I get involved?

  • Sponsoring a Child
  • Getting involved in a Charity Challenge (biking round Cambodia or climbing Mt Kilamanjaro are a few examples)
  • Volunteer to help run World Vision programmes in NZ
  • Participating in/running a 40-hour Famine
  • Donating directly
  • Getting involved in World Vision advocacy campaigns
  • Joining/starting a World Vision group at your school or university

UNICEF (United Nations Children’s Fund)

Friday, February 20th, 2009


www.unicef.org.nz

What do they do?
UNICEF - the United Nations Children’s Fund - is the world’s leading agency for children. UNICEF works closely with children, women and communities as well as governments, other UN agencies, faith-based groups, non-government organisations and the private sector to create a better world for every child.

How can I get involved?

Fundraise – Put the ‘fun’ back into fundraising!  Take part in a run, cycle, or swim while raising money for UNICEF.  It’s easy to make your own fundraising web page!

Campaign for Change - Make some noise and help shape better policies and practices for children.  Whether you write to your local MP about an issue affecting children, fill out one of our surveys or sign a petition, you’re helping affect change for a new generation of kids.  Join UNICEF’s Campaigners for Change by emailing takeaction@unicef.org.nz for further updates.

Buy an Inspired GiftDoes your Dad need another pair of socks?  Why not help girls in Ghana go to school instead?  Purchase a bicycle for a girl in Ghana from our online shop and help give a better future to children!

Donate
- Your donation will go further with UNICEF! For every dollar donated, we can leverage $10 for children who need your help.

Volunteer - There are a number of ways that you can get involved with UNICEF NZ as a volunteer:

  • You can help out in their Wellington office with administration duties
  • You can help them with fundraising events
  • If you think you have some specific skills and experience that will be of value to them then you can apply for an internship


Trade Aid

Friday, February 20th, 2009


www.tradeaid.org.nz

What do they do?
Trade Aid is a New Zealand founded, alternative trading organisation which has been working with craft producers and small farmers in developing countries around the world for 35 years. Trade Aid currently has 32 retail shops in both the North and South Islands and runs an extensive public education programme which aims to equip New Zealanders to speak out for greater justice in world trade.

How can I get involved?

Shop at Trade Aid! =D

Volunteer for Trade Aid - At Trade Aid there are opportunities to be a retail volunteer, speaker about Trade Aid issues to community or school groups, campaigner, education team member or a trustee. Get in touch with your local shop and see what you can get involved with today, sign up on-line at www.tradeaid.org.nz or pop in for a chat.

Quaker Peace and Service Aotearoa/New Zealand

Friday, February 20th, 2009

quaker

www.quaker.org.nz/groups/qpsanz

What do they do?
This is the arm of the Quakers (The Religious Society of Friends) in Aotearoa New Zealand that deals with social justice issues. They aim to give service and create peace in Quakerly ways.

How can I get involved?
If you are a young Quaker (aged between approximately 16 and 39) you can join the ‘Young Friends’. Regular meetings are held in Auckland, Wellington, and Christchurch. At their annual camps, held over Easter, Young Friends have speakers come and talk to the group, where there will tend to be discussion on important issues related to justice and peace. Young Friends also pay to offset their carbon from camps, and aim to shop local and eat vegetarian as a means of reducing damage to the Earth.

Caritas

Wednesday, January 14th, 2009

caritas

www.caritas.org.nz

What do they do?

Caritas is the Catholic agency for justice, peace and development. Caritas Aotearoa New Zealand is part of Caritas Internationalis, which is a confederation of 154 Catholic aid, development and social justice agencies from around the world. Caritas agencies work in over 198 countries: delivering aid, supporting development, and working for justice.

How can I be involved?

Donate!

Campaigning – Caritas are involved in many campaigns, including Aid, Children, Cluster Munitions Crime and Punishment, Debt, Environmental Justice, HIV and AIDS, Human Rights Make Poverty History Millennium Development Goals, Submissions to NZ Government, and Trade. They offer excellent resources on their website to help you join with them to take action on these issues.

Why fair trade?

Thursday, August 28th, 2008

By Nicole Mesman

It’s Saturday night and I am sitting in the back of our family’s ute as we make our way home from a friend’s house. I lean against the window staring out, when suddenly our old front stereo roars into life. It’s Dad; he has turned on the radio for what he thinks is the 7 o-clock news. He’s a little early however, they are just on a pre-news interview.

car-radioHi’, she says my name is Molly Crower and you’re listening to a pre-news muse, from the home of radio truth. Tonight we will be interviewing Hayden Spencer, Trade Aid’s spokesperson in New Zealand regarding the upcoming Fair Trade Fortnight. Good evening Hayden.

Hello Molly.’

So Hayden I hear that Fair Trade Fortnight is coming up from the 3rd to the 18th of May?’

It certainly is.’

Perhaps you could give us a bit of background? For starters what is fair trade

My ears prick up. This interview sounds interesting! I tell Dad to turn it up.

Nepal potsWell’ continues Hayden, fair trade is when companies buy goods such as cotton, tea, cocoa and coffee beans, and also craft items such as clothing, baskets, jewellery etc, from producers in places such as Africa, Asia and South America for a fair and consistent price. It also works to protect workers rights by preventing the use of harmful sprays around crops, increasing safe working conditions, and decreasing the numbers of child workers.’

And is it true that through fair trade’ the buyer is also contributing U.S 5cents per pound of coffee to the grower’s community for them to invest at will?

That’s right Molly’.

So now what can you tell us about Fair Trade Fortnight Hayden?

Well, it’s about raising people’s awareness, this year the fortnight focuses on environmental justice which is about us realising that the developing world, who contribute the LEAST to climate change will be the ones who feel it the MOST.’

Really?!’

CinnamonYes, I’m afraid so. The majority of the world live in developing countries yet it is the small percentage of the world’s population that live in developed countries (like us!) that have contributed most to this global problem. What people need to be think about Molly is how unfair is it that developing countries who are already losing out by unfair trade rules, will be expected to foot more than their fair share of the climate change bill. Realising this encourages us to think about how we can reduce our carbon footprint and reminds us how important it is to support fair trade. Throughout the Fortnight there will be loads of activities, competitions and events will be run all over the country. There’s more information at www.tradeaid.co.nz or www.fairtrade.org.nz.

That was great Hayden.

No problem Molly.

The interview finished and was replaced by the news, but I heard none of it. There were so many questions buzzing around in my head. How did fair trade start? Was Hayden just presenting one side of the story? Was fair trade really as good as they made it out to be?

tibetan-carpetsMy determination to find out drove me to the internet very early the next morning, where I found a range of information to answer my questions. I discovered that it all started in the late 1940’s after World War II, with some U.S churches selling handicrafts made by refugees in Europe. The idea of fair trade first came to Aotearoa New Zealand when Richard and Vi Cottrell, who had been helping out with the Tibetan refuge resettlement in India in 1969, came back to New Zealand to raise funds for the refugees. They started by selling a $1000 worth of Tibetan carpets in Christchurch and later moved on to develop Trade Aid stores across the country. At Trade Aid all products are made organically, produced on a small scale and shipped to conserve fuel.

I also found out that although most people would agree that fair trade is a good thing, it does have it critics. My research uncovered some individuals who thought supermarkets and companies where abusing the fair trade concept to make greater financial gains on products. One independent survey revealed that products where between 9-16 percent more expensive than others. One site didn’t think fair trade went far enough. It questioned the structures on which fair trade was built, saying that if they did not change significantly, the rich would continue to get richer and the poor remain poor.

After reading all this, my opinion is that fair trade is overall positive thing. Yes, supermarkets and some companies can profit from the products, but you can avoid this by buying from ethical stores such as Trade Aid. It may not be perfect, but anything that improves the working conditions and livelihoods of farmers and their families has got to be a good thing. Right!?

shopping-bags-smlTAKE ACTION - How can YOU support fair trade?


LEARN MORE

Learn more about environmental justice at www.tradeaid.co.nz
Check out the great cartoons at www.maketradefair.com which explain how unfair the current trade system is.

A version of this article was published in the May 2008 issues of actv8.